The layer in the earth’s atmosphere that protects us from UV radiation is shrinking due to climate change

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NASA warns that the layer in the atmosphere that protects us from the sun’s deadly ultraviolet radiation is cooling and shrinking due to man-made greenhouse gas emissions.

The mesosphere, located 30 to 80 miles above the surface, cools four to five degrees Fahrenheit and contracts at the poles by up to 150 feet per decade – and these speeds are expected to continue.

A team of American scientists analyzed how the temperature and pressure in the mesosphere changed over the summer skies of the North and South Poles.

They analyzed blue ice clouds found over the poles in June that are sensitive to moderate temperatures and water vapor so the team can see changes firsthand.

“The only way they would be expected to change this way is for the temperature to get colder and the water vapor to increase,” said James Russell, co-author of the study and an atmospheric scientist at Hampton University in Virginia, in a statement.

Russel also stated that “colder temperatures and abundant water vapor are both linked to climate change in the upper atmosphere”.

The results mean that as the carbon dioxide increased, the mesosphere cooled, lowering atmospheric pressure and causing it to shrink.

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A team of American scientists analyzed how the temperature and pressure in the mesosphere changed over the summer skies of the North and South Poles. They analyzed blue ice clouds found over the poles in June that are sensitive to moderate temperatures and water vapor so the team can see changes firsthand

Although the warning has just been publicly shared, this cooling and shrinking of the mesosphere comes as no surprise to the researchers who conducted the analysis.

For years, models “have shown this effect,” said Brentha Thurairajah, an atmospheric scientist at Virginia Tech who contributed to the study, in the statement.

“It would have been stranger if our analysis of the data hadn’t shown that.”

The researchers compiled data from three NASA satellites that have been monitoring the mesosphere for the past 30 years to observe trends over time.

“The only way you would expect them to change this way is when the temperature gets colder and the water vapor increases,” said James Russell, co-author of the study and an atmospheric scientist at Hampton University, Virginia, in an explanation

Scott Bailey, an atmospheric scientist at Virginia Tech in Blacksburg and who led the study, said in a statement, “It will take you several decades to control these trends and isolate what is caused by greenhouse gas emissions, changes in the solar cycle, and other effects .

“We had to compile data from three satellites.”

About 250 miles above the surface is the thermosphere, which is also affected by climate change on Earth.

Researchers found atmospheric gases in this part of the atmosphere, satellite towing can cause the devices to slow down in near-earth orbits.

However, the team does not care about active satellites, but rather those that are dead and are likely to burn up in the earth’s atmosphere.

The mesosphere, located 30 to 80 miles above the surface, cools four to five degrees Fahrenheit and contracts at the poles by up to 150 feet per decade - and these speeds are expected to continue.

The mesosphere, located 30 to 80 miles above the surface, cools four to five degrees Fahrenheit and contracts at the poles by up to 150 feet per decade – and these speeds are expected to continue.

When they experience drag, their time in orbit can be extended and added to the millions of pieces of space junk still orbiting our planet.

NASA is looking for ways to help the US government better understand the effects of climate change and extreme weather events. In May it announced that it was developing a new satellite-centric program for this purpose.

At least five satellites, known as the Earth System Observatory, will be launched by 2029 to create a 3D view of the Earth and see everything from bedrock to atmosphere.

The satellites will study a range of areas related to human activity and weather events, including aerosols, rising sea levels, and the effects of climate change on food and agriculture.

About 250 miles above the surface is the thermosphere, which is also affected by climate change on Earth.  Researchers found that atmospheric gases in this part of the atmosphere can cause satellite drag by slowing down devices in near-Earth orbit

About 250 miles above the surface is the thermosphere, which is also affected by climate change on Earth. Researchers found that atmospheric gases in this part of the atmosphere can cause satellite drag by slowing down devices in near-Earth orbit

The measurement of the collapse of the ice sheet as well as earthquakes, volcanic eruptions and landslides are also part of the mission.

The assessment of droughts and the associated planning of water use for agriculture is also part of the mission.

“I’ve seen firsthand the effects of hurricanes made more intense and destructive by climate change, like Maria and Irma,” NASA Administrator Senator Bill Nelson said in a statement. ‘

Nelson continued, “Much of what we have learned about climate change on Earth over the past three decades has been based on satellite observations and research by NASA. NASA’s new Earth System Observatory will expand that work, providing the world with an unprecedented understanding of our earth’s climate system, equipping us with next-generation data critical to climate change mitigation, and protecting our communities in the face of natural disasters.



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